Organic Gardening Spring Seminars 2015

Don’t waste your time — get good advice

Our plants were featured in articles in the Cleveland Plain Dealer and Cleveland.com last year. Our tomato plants have reached 900 cubic feet in size and over 20 feet wide x 8 feet tall x 7 feet thick. These are plants whose nutritional requirements are being met. Big, healthy, productive plants also produce more nutrient rich food — and they don’t have many pest problems so spraying is not needed.

Saying you are satisfied with smaller, less productive plants is also saying you are satisfied with less nutritious food — and more problems all summer.

jaspar

These pictures show a healthy tomato plant — planted at the right time, in the right soil, and fed with a living fertilizer.

It measured 20 ft x 8ft x 7ft or over 900 cu. ft. — and this one plant produced about 100 pints of richly flavored tomatoes.

We encourage you to see the results of our products used on our plants.

jaspar 2Almost every garden center in this area now sells “organic” products. Many hold “organic” gardening seminars. If they are growing plants larger, healthier, and more productive than ours, you should definitely learn from them.  But no garden center in the area can match the quality of our product lines, the health of our plants — or the selection, quality and productivity of our seeds and plants.

We have put together a selection of seeds, plants, soils, and fertilizers that will make your gardens more successful and the food you produce more nutrient rich. Anyone that has tried our fertilizer knows what a difference it makes.

But the most important component of a successful backyard garden is the knowledge of the person tending it. Most successful vegetable gardeners learn either by many years of trial and error or by many hours of research.

We have a better idea.

Our organic gardening seminars are the simplest, cheapest, most convenient way to learn how to  grow more, and better quality food, with less effort and lower costs. Your backyard garden should have a significant impact on the health and the budget of your family — not just be a place to waste your time.

Our seminars give you the information you need to put in a backyard garden — and be rewarded with enough food to more than make your time spent in your garden — even the first year. Even experienced gardeners however, will find very useful information. See seminar topics below in seminar descriptions.

Plan Before You Plant!gypsy plants

We will all be eager to get started this Spring, but take your time and plan things out.

Researchers are finding that a small mistake made early in the season (like planting too early) severely impacts the health, vigor, and productivity of vegetable plants throughout the season.

It is like a person with a traumatized childhood suffering a string of illnesses throughout their life that are related to problems in their early years.

I have already heard from gardeners that have made mistakes that will lower their yields this year. These errors included buying the wrong seeds, buying them too early, and planting them too early. The seminars will get you on a good schedule and off to a strong start.
Above seminars are $20 per seminar
or
attend all 6 seminars – for only $100
 
Please reserve seating by emailing to canterburycgardens@sbcglobal.net
— or phoning 440-899-2740.  
 
Seating is limited and reservations will be on a first come basis.

 

 

2015 Organic Gardening Seminar Schedule

Garden Planning and Early Season Gardening
Sun, 3/1/2015, 4PM
Essentials of Organic Gardening
Sun, 3/8/2015, 4PM
Fertilizers, Soils & Composting
Sun, 3/15/2015, 4PM
No Till Container and Raised Bed Gardening
Sun, 3/22/2015, 4PM
Growing the Best Tasting and Most Productive Tomatoes
Sun, 3/29/2015, 4PM
Getting More and Better Food From Your Garden to Your Table
Sun, 4/12/2015, 4PM

 

 

 

Garden Planning and Early Season Gardening

Sun, 3/1/2015, 4PM

 

One of the biggest factors in mini springdetermining the success or failure of a backyard garden is the time spent prior to planting. It is the most cost effective time invested in the garden — which is why long time gardeners spend so much time studying seed catalogs.

This seminar will teach you how to get your garden off to an earlier and better start.

Topics include
– Making the time you spend more productive
– Crop and variety selection
– Seed and plant selection
– Crop timing – multi-cropping
– Garden bed or container shapes, sizes, materials
– Mini-greenhouses
– Structural supports
– Netting
– Attracting beneficial insects, and other animals
– Winter gardens

 

Mychorrizal fungi are one reason why organic veggies can absorb more nutrients. They grow from plant roots and act like fish nets to gather more nutrients from the soil than the roots can absorb alone.

Essentials of Organic Gardening Sun, 3/8/2015, 4PM    

This seminar covers the essentials of organic gardening — the beneficial relationship between plants and other creatures. This relationship provides essential nutrients, growth hormones, and natural protective systems to grow plants that are as healthy as possible. It improves the conditions for beneficial microbes, beneficial insects and pollinators.

Organic gardening is not just substituting organic pesticides for chemical pesticides — It should be growing plants that are so healthy, they don’t need pesticides.

Topics include 
– Maximizing garden karma by minimizing human input
– The importance of observation
– Soil, plant relationship
– The plant microbiome
– Using mychorrizal fungi to help plants help each other
– Balancing soil carbon, soil minerals and soil moisture
– Balancing soil nutrients
– The importance of consistent and proper soil moisture
– Giving plants room to be healthy
– Beneficial insects and other garden allies
– Force feeding vs providing essential nutrients

 

Fertilizers, Soils & Composting

Sun, 3/15/2015, 4PM

 

living soil

You will see an amazing increase in yields  — and healthier, more nutritious crops — when your start to feed the soil biology and not the plants.

Every American should be required to take a class on soil biology. Fertile soils are one of our country’s greatest resources. By learning about the connection between soils and our health we can understand the need to protect our farm soils like we protect our national parks.

Topics include 

– The importance of humus
– Developing better soil structure by building soil fiber
– Holding soil nutrients through soil biology and cation exchange capacity
– Building a supercharged soil biology
– Feed the soil, not the plants
– Soil mineral amendments vs plant produced compounds
– Providing primary and secondary metabolites
– Balancing soil carbon, soil minerals and soil moisture
– All compost is not equal
– Maximizing compost benefits
– Composting methods
– Compost timing and ingredients
– Vermiculture — our compost

 

No Till Container and Raised Bed Gardening

Sun, 3/22/2015, 4PM

 

In gardening, knowledge = time and money.

A 14ft x 8 ft tomato plant grown in a container without changing or turning the soil.

A 14ft x 8 ft tomato plant grown in a container without changing or turning the soil.

There is no better example of this than by learning how to garden in your beds or in containers without tilling — and using the same container and potting soil year after year.

We have been experimenting with no till gardening for a while now with success. It certainly saves time and money on soil preparation.

We recommend attending, at least, the soil and fertilizer seminar before attending this one — preferably more — since this is a more advanced class.

Caution: Do not try this without learning how or you can have very poor results.

Topics include 

– Making the change to No Till
– Cover crops
– Top dressing
– Mychorrizal fungi
– Diversity, companion planting
– Long term mineral use
– Crop rotation
– Mulching


Growing the Best Tasting and Most Productive Tomatoes

Sun, 3/29/2015, 4PM

tomatoes cherry 2012b

Nothing demonstrates low expectations of a vegetable garden better than tomato plants. If you have seen our plants the last couple of years, you know what I mean.

Most people are happy with tomato plants that are about 4 or 5 feet tall and yield a half dozen tomatoes — but tomato plants can reach almost thirty feet tall and can yield up to 340 lbs. per plant.

In 2012, we picked almost 1500 paste tomatoes from a single container — and our plants have stretched to over 20 feet wide by 8 feet tall and 7 feet thick.

This seminar is all about tomatoes.

Topics include  

– Variety selection
– Disease prevention and suppression
– Support system / netting
– Sun/water levels
– Soil
– Fertilizing
– Container size
– Pruning

 

Getting More and Better Food From Your Garden to Your Table

Sun, 4/12/2015, 4PM

 

Experienced gardeners never frozen and preserved foodsevaluate their garden performance by fresh produce, but by how much food is put on their tables.

Although most gardeners focus on tomatoes, there are actually several crops that are more cost-effective to grow in the same space. For example, we harvested over $600 worth of incredible snap peas and gourmet beans from each of several 16 ft rows. This year, we hope to do better.

Putting more food on the table involves knowing what varieties of plants to grow, the best methods for growing them, and the best ways to use and preserve them. That is what this seminar is about.

Topics include 

– Refrigeration
– Choosing crops and varieties
– Freezing
– Canning
– Pickling
– Fermenting
– Drying

 

 

Don’t be pressured into signing an expensive lawn care contract (even organic) until you attend this seminar. This year, make an educated choice about your lawn care. You could easily save over $100 for a few minutes a year.

 

Organic Lawn Care Seminar

Sun, April 19, at 4 PM

baby boy in grass

There is nothing our society does that is more senseless than our lawn care practices. As  soon as we see a single dandelion, or clover flower, we spray our lawns with chemicals that poison the bees feeding on them.

These same chemicals increase the risk of our children and pets getting cancer by 700%. What argument that can be made for the benefits of these products that is worth the life of a child?

As Americans we spend $27 billion per year caring for our turf and lawns – that’s ten times more than is spent on school textbooks! What do we get for our $27 billion dollars? Our lawn care practices are harmful to our families, pets, wildlife, and the environment. Runoff from chemical lawn fertilizers is also a major contributor to the toxic algae blooms that are poisoning our drinking water.

Less expensive and better organic products are available. Our lawn looks as good as any on the block for about $40 per year — we haven’t watered it for 4 years — and the organic fertilizer applications take less than a hour each year. Hundreds of our customers have been extremely happy with our organic lawn care products — while saving money. Their results even have their neighbors asking questions.

We are all looking to save money these days and learning how to take care of your own lawn organically is a great place to start. We will explain your options in organic lawn care products — since they vary greatly in quality and price.

Don’t be pressured into signing an expensive lawn care contract (even organic) until you attend this seminar. This year, make an educated choice about your lawn care.

This seminar is the easiest, most convenient way to find out how to improve your lawn – and make it safer for children & pets. Learn everything you need to know in about an hour.

 

– Seed selection
– Fertilizing
– Watering
– Mowing
– Mulching
– Weeding
– Clover companion
– Nutrient retention

 

The cost for attending this seminar will be $20 and attendees will receive a coupon for 20% off a lawn fertilizer purchase this spring.  
 
Please reserve seating by emailing to canterburycgardens@sbcglobal.net

— or phoning 440-899-2740.

Seating is limited and reservations will be on a first come basis.